Skip to content

press & reviews

press: Slaves to the Rhythm

EdgeBoston.com, May, 17, 2011:

“If there were a gay teen reading my book, my hope is they identify with the strength and courage I found,” Connell continued. “The ’It Gets Better campaign’ is absolutely true. But I think the reality is–it doesn’t always get better in the ways we want, or expect. Or,” the author added, “on our timeline. But the friends I have met–the family I have grown into–they are the reason I am here today living this amazing life. A life, and a lifestyle, I never could have imagined 25 years ago.” Read more

 

Slaves to the Rhythm chosen as one of The Advocate Magazine’s “What to Read”, March, 2011:

“In this raw, stirring memoir, Connell recalls coming of age as a repressed gay kid in a devout Irish Catholic family and his eventual meeting with his lover, Stephan, who would die of AIDS complications.  Through his journal writings, the author shares the extraordinary courage and strength he summoned to care for his partner during their final year together as they began to gradually surrender their lives each day.”

 

WBUR/Radio Boston interview with Anthony Brooks, March, 30, 2011:

Slaves to the Rhythm is a story about love, death and personal discovery. The book is actually two stories: one, a set of journal entries about the slow death from AIDS of Connell’s partner, Stefan, in the 1990s. The other, a series of vignettes from Connell’s childhood and coming of age in a Philadelphia suburb. Read more and listen to the interview

 

Bay Windows Profile - February 9, 2011:

When Terry Connell received a copy of his family tree in early 2009, he knew that he had to finally publish his book. In Connell’s opinion, his father had omitted an important name from the tree: Stephan, his partner, who had died of AIDS-related illnesses in 1993. Although Connell’s relationship with his huge Irish Catholic family — he has ten siblings — had improved over the years, he was still hurt that his father had neglected to include the love of his life on the family document.  Read more

 

reviews: Slaves to the Rhythm

By Amos Lassen

By Grady Harp